Ravens' Tales

Bringing Myths to life

National Curriculum Links (Including the 2013  N.C. and non-statutory guidance):

English -  English programme of study: Spoken Language – years 1-6

 Ensure that pupils build on the oral language skills that have been taught in preceding years. Pupils should be taught to develop their competence in spoken language and listening to enhance the effectiveness with which they are able to communicate across a range of contexts and to a range of audiences. 
Attention should also be paid to increasing pupils’ vocabulary, from describing their immediate world and feelings to developing a broader, deeper and richer vocabulary to discuss abstract concepts and a wider range of topics, and to their knowledge about language as a whole. 

History
know and understand the history of these islands as a coherent, chronological narrative, from the earliest times to the present day: how people’s lives have shaped this nation and how Britain has influenced and been influenced by the wider world  know and understand significant aspects of the history of the wider world: the nature of ancient civilisations; the expansion and dissolution of empires; characteristic features of past non-European societies; achievements and follies of mankind  gain and deploy a historically-grounded understanding of abstract terms such as ‘empire’, ‘civilisation’, ‘parliament’ and ‘peasantry’

Key stage 1 Pupils should develop an awareness of the past, using common words and phrases relating to the passing of time. They should know where the people and events they study fit within a chronological framework and identify similarities and differences between ways of life in different periods. They should use a wide vocabulary of everyday historical terms. They should ask and answer questions, choosing and using parts of stories and other sources to show that they know and understand key features of events. They should understand some of the ways in which we find out about the past and identify different ways in which it is represented. 

Key stage 2:
the Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the Kingdom of England to the time of Edward the Confessor This could include: 
  •  Viking raids and invasion 
  •  resistance by Alfred the Great and Athelstan, first king of England 
  •  further Viking invasions and Danegeld.
 the achievements of the earliest civilizations – an overview of where and when the first civilizations appeared and a depth study of one of the following: Ancient Sumer; The Indus Valley; Ancient Egypt; The Shang Dynasty of Ancient China 
 Ancient Greece – a study of Greek life and achievements and their influence on the western world 

Key stage 3:
Pupils should extend and deepen their chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history, so that it provides a well-informed context for wider learning. Pupils should identify significant events, make connections, draw contrasts, and analyse trends within periods and over long arcs of time. 
  • ideas, political power, industry and empire: Britain, 1745-1901 - the development of the British Empire with a depth study.
  • the study of an aspect or theme in British history that consolidates and extends pupils’ chronological knowledge from before 1066
  • at least one study of a significant society or issue in world history and its interconnections with other world developments